THE AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN AND THE LAW CONFERENCE

THE TRANSFORMATIVE JUSTICE COALITION,  THE AFRICAN AMERICAN POLICY FORUM, AND THE CENTER FOR INTERSECTIONALITY AND SOCIAL POLICY STUDIES PRESENT:


BLACK WOMEN STILL RISING: ENDING STRUCTURAL RACISM, PATRIARCHY, AND VIOLENCE
 THE AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN AND THE LAW CONFERENCE

When: Tuesday, September 13, 5:30pm-9:00pm and Wednesday, September 14, 8:30am-8:00pm

Where: National Education Association, 1201 16th St NW, Washington, DC 20036


Washington, DC – The Transformative Justice Coalition, the African American Policy Forum, and the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies will host “The African American Women and the Law Conference” to examine the role of the law and public policy as it impacts the lives, barriers, and opportunities for Black women’s advancement. The purpose of this historic conference is to develop a Black Women’s Legal and Public Policy Agenda to guide our advocacy efforts for the next several years.


The conference will be held on Tuesday, September 13th through Wednesday, September 14th at the National Education Association. Convened by Barbara Arnwine, President and Founder of the Transformative Justice Coalition, host of Radio One’s international radio show, “Igniting Change with Barbara Arnwine,” and Adjunct Professor at North Carolina Central University and Kimberle Crenshaw, Co-Founder and Director of the African American Policy Forum, and Professor of Law at Columbia University and UCLA Law Schools, this conference will feature esteemed legal scholars and advocates including, amongst others, Barbara Smith, Co-Founder of the Combahee Collective, Adrienne Wing, Associate Dean for International and Comparative Law Programs and Bessie Dutton Murray Professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, and Farah Tanis, Co-Founder and Executive Director of the Black Women’s Blueprint. This conference aims to highlight the efforts of Black women attorneys, advocates, activists, and change agents and also elevate the narratives of Black women and girls impacted by various educational, judicial, and other social systems. Ultimately, this conference aims to spark and sustain the systematic transformation of Black women and girls’ lives.


Black women and girls occupy a precarious, and often paradoxical, position in the US. Although data suggests Black women pursue post-secondary education at higher rates than either Black men or white women, they are incarcerated at staggeringly high rates. Similarly, Black women account for the fastest growing segment of small business ownership, yet the median wealth of black women is just $100. This contradictory nature of Black women and girls’ experience highlights their unique positioning as targets of varying forms and types of systemic oppression, i.e. racism, sexism, etc., and also their collective efforts to challenge said systems. Thus, the stance of the Transformative Justice Coalition, and co-conveners of the AAWLC, is the necessary adoption of intersectional frameworks that speak to the varying and intersecting systems of exploitation.


The African American Women and the Law Conference will close out with an evening reception entitled, #SayHerName: An Evening of Arts and Activism. This event will both showcase a variety of art forms, from dance to song, as well as provide vigil for women who have been killed by the police and their families. Fran Garrett, mother of Michelle Cusseaux, Gina Best, mother of India Kager, and Misha Charlton, sister of Meagan Hockaday’s sister, will be in attendance. #SayHerName will provide a space for Black women attorneys and their allies to celebrate the progress made concerning Black women and girls and will also serve as a call to action for furthering an intersectional social justice agenda.