Stand Up for Justice for the OKC 13: Visibility and Accountability Beyond the Holtzclaw Verdict

Stand Up for Justice for the OKC 13

The day of accountability is coming soon for Holtzclaw -- the former Oklahoma City Police Officer will be sentenced onJanuary 21, 2016 following his conviction last month of 18 of 36 counts of sexual assault. Holtzclaw’s preying on Black women in the course of duty came to light only after Jannie Ligons, a 57-year-old grandmother, reported the crime to the police. 12 more Black women told similar stories of being violated by Holtzclaw.

But Holtzclaw’s sentencing cannot be the sole focus of our efforts for justice. We must look beyond the verdict and focus on the intersections of race, gender, class, substance dependency and system-involvement that rendered the OKC 13 prey to a rapist with a badge. Countless Black women will continue to be vulnerable to sexual abuse by police even if Holtzclaw receives a life sentence.

Daniel Holtzclaw was not an anomaly. Approximately 1,000 officers lost their badges in a six-year period after having engaged in some form of sexual misconduct.  And this is a gross undercounting of how many officers engage in such conduct. Few know that sexual misconduct is the second most reported form of police abuse because it is rarely addressed by the media and within our movements against sexual violence and police abuse.  

We have to make this all-too-common form of police abuse visible.

Let’s join together to combat the intersectional erasure of victims of state violence and rape.

 

January 19: PREPARE TO TAKE ACTION
Join us for a webinar on the Holtzclaw case and sexual abuse of Black women by law enforcement. Hear from the Organizers of OKC Artists for Justice and other voices from across the country. Share your plans for Visibility and Accountability.

January 20th: MAKE SEXUAL ASSAULT BY LAW ENFORCEMENT VISIBLE
Stand with the Women in OKC and around the country to bring Sexual Abuse by Police Out of the Shadows!

January 21st: DEMAND ACCOUNTABILITY FROM OFFICERS, INSTITUTIONS AND ALLIES: 
Not only must police departments and elected officials be held accountable, but police sexual abuse must be centered in feminist anti-violence advocacy and anti-racist police reform.  

Listen, Learn and Stand!  Register Now!!!

If you demand an end to sexual violence and an end to police abuse, then find a way to get involved!  Here are a few ways you can:

  • January 20 - JOIN THE TWITTER STORM

  • Using the hashtags #SayHerName, #BlackWomenMatter and #OKC13, share your story of sexual assault, other stories you know, and your thoughts on why the Holtzclaw case matters. Keep your eye out for AAPF’s OKC Toolkit for sample Tweets and info to help you create your own!

  • January 20 - SHARE A POEM, REFLECTION, OR ARTISTIC EXPRESSION

  • that sheds light on Black women’s experiences of sexual assault on Facebook and over your own social media. Together, we can show that what happened to the OKC 13 was not an anomaly. Look for details at OKC Artists for Justice.
     

  • January 20 - HOLD A FORUM OR IMPROMPTU DISCUSSION 

  • to draw attention to the circumstances that make Black women vulnerable to police abuse. If you are in Oklahoma City, attend OKC Artists for Justice's Community Forum to discuss the Holtzclaw case and how community members can get involved in making changes. Panelists will include Grace Franklin, Candace Liger, Barbara Arnwine, Kimberle Crenshaw, and more. The event will be at 6:00pm at Langston University, 4205 North Lincoln Blvd.
     

  • January 21 - On the day of Holtzclaw’s sentencing

  • join us in sharing and demanding CONCRETE STEPS toward accountability for officer-involved sexual misconduct.
     

  • January 21 - During Holtzclaw’s sentencing,

  • TWEET YOUR SUPPORT FOR THE OKC 13 using #SayHerName, #BlackWomenMatter and #OKC13. Demand resources for the OKC 13 and other women across the country who have been sexually assaulted by police. Ask what local organizations are doing to address this issue.

Let’s use this moment to demonstrate that an increasing number of activists, journalists and stakeholders recognize sexual assault as a form of police violence, one that must be included in all of our efforts to combat anti-Black state violence.

unnamed.png