Kimberlé Crenshaw & Eve Ensler Receive Honorary Doctorates from John Jay College of Criminal Justice

On Wednesday June 1st, AAPF Co-Founder & Executive Director Kimberlé Crenshaw & AAPF Board Member Eve Ensler received honorary doctorate degrees from John Jay College of Criminal Justice for their visionary leadership and advocacy around women and girls. Read more here:  http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/news/distinguished-law-professor-kimberl%C3%A9-williams-crenshaw-and-playwrightactivist-eve-ensler

#SayHerName: Why Kimberle Crenshaw is Fighting for Forgotten Women

The campaign, #SayHerName, was created to raise awareness about the number of women and girls that are killed by law enforcement officers. For Crenshaw – who coined the term “intersectionality” in the 1980s to describe the way different forms of discrimination overlap and compound each other – it is a brutal illustration of how racism and sexism play out on black women’s bodies.

African American Policy Forum and Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies Announce Executive Director Kimberlé Crenshaw’s Centennial Professor Appointment at London School of Economics

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:
Rachel Anspach
Senior Writer, African American Policy Forum/Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies
rachel.anspach@aapf.org

African American Policy Forum and Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies Announce Executive Director Kimberlé Crenshaw’s Centennial Professor Appointment at London School of Economics

New York, New York -- May 10, 2016 -- The African American Policy Forum and the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies are pleased to announce that Executive Director Kimberlé Crenshaw will serve as Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics from 2016-2018. To launch her position, Crenshaw is currently spending May, 2016, in residence at LSE. While in London, Crenshaw, a professor at Columbia Law School and the UCLA School of Law, will give a series of lectures on intersectionality in a global context, and how AAPF’s and CISPS’ recent work on the #BlackGirlsMatter and #SayHerName campaigns relate to realities in London and across the globe.

“I am deeply honored to accept this appointment,” Crenshaw stated. “While in London, I look forward to exploring how my research on the intersections of state-sanctioned violence, race, and gender, connect to the experiences of Black women and girls in the UK.”

The focus of Crenshaw’s research and advocacy over the past two years has been encapsulated in two reports and corresponding political campaigns. Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected examines the ways in which Black girls and other girls of color are impacted by the school-to-prison pipeline; and Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women analyzes and tells the stories of Black women killed by the police.

“We are really excited by Kimberle Crenshaw’s Centennial Professor appointment, which begins this week,” remarked Diane Perrons, head of department at the LSE Gender Institute and Professor of Economic Geography and Gender Studies. “We especially look forward to the ways in which Professor Crenshaw’s contributions will foster interdisciplinary scholarship in the LSE more broadly and between Gender Studies and Law in particular. By so doing, we know her tenure will leave a legacy beyond her period of office.”

This appointment is a reflection of Crenshaw’s pathbreaking work for the needs of those most marginalized within our society to be at the center of efforts for social justice. Earlier in 2016, Crenshaw was also honored with the Outstanding Scholar Award from the American Bar Foundation, a prestigious award is given annually to a member of the academy who has engaged in unprecedented scholarship in the legal field. In 2015, Crenshaw was featured in the Ebony Power 100, a list honoring the contemporary heroes of the black community, and was #1 on Ms. Magazine’s list of Feminist Heroes of 2015. 

More information on Crenshaw’s appointment at LSE can be found here: http://www.lse.ac.uk/genderInstitute/whosWho/profiles/visitingAcademics/Kimberle-Crenshaw.aspx

KIMBERLE CRENSHAW AWARDED EXCEPTIONAL MERIT IN MEDIA AWARD FOR NEW YORK TIMES OP-ED, “THE GIRLS OBAMA FORGOT”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:
Rachel Anspach
Senior Writer, African American Policy Forum
rachel.anspach@aapf.org

KIMBERLE CRENSHAW AWARDED EXCEPTIONAL MERIT IN MEDIA AWARD FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES OP-ED, “THE GIRLS OBAMA FORGOT”

New York, New York -- May 16, 2016 -- The African American Policy Forum and the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies are pleased to announce that Executive Director Kimberle Crenshaw has been recognized by the National Women’s Political Caucus with the Exceptional Merit in Media Award (EMMA) for her New York Times op-ed, “The Girls Obama Forgot.” The EMMA is awarded annually to media that “inform and educate the public about critical issues that impact women’s lives.” Crenshaw contributed the column as part of #WhyWeCantWait, a research and activism campaign elevating the life experiences of women and girls of color and pushing for the incorporation of gender in racial justice initiatives like My Brother's Keeper.

The Award "truly reflects Kimberle Crenshaw’s boldness and commitment to racial justice,” commented author and professor Kiese Laymon. “After all, the White House's recent attention to Black women and girls grew out of a political strategy developed and brilliantly executed by a group of cultural workers and activists led by Crenshaw and the African American Policy Forum. We thank Kimberle for her leadership in making our nation’s leaders reckon with their lack of investment in Black women and girls."

Adds philanthropic strategist Alvin Starks: “Many of us were unaware or unwilling to speak about the injustices facing Black women and girls, but now we are better able to envision a social justice movement that includes and demands their presence."  

The op-ed, published July 29, 2014, was part of a broad-based intersectional political agenda galvanized by prominent Black feminists and advocates of all races and genders. Activists released open letters to President Obama, organized town hall hearings for women and girls of color to share their stories, organized a Congressional Briefing, and more, in an effort to realign racial justice initiatives like My Brother's Keeper to reflect values of inclusion, equal opportunity and shared fate.

Crenshaw's "leadership and courage have been instrumental in changing the landscape, discourse and direction for 'the girls Obama forgot,'" states playwright and activist Eve Ensler. "And I think we are all deepening our understanding and active practice of solidarity as a result."

Crenshaw acknowledges many others at the forefront of efforts to call on the White House to include women and girls in their campaign to redress the racial opportunity gap, including Laymon, Starks and Ensler, as well as Luke Harris, Mary Frances Berry, Terry O’Neill, Jody Myrum, Jennifer Buffett, Peter Buffett and Pamela Shifman.

Civil rights leader Barbara Arnwine, of the Transformative Justice Coalition, described by Crenshaw as "an inspirational ally," accepted the award on her behalf. Arnwine's remarks applauded Crenshaw as "a woman of great courage motivated by a deep love for women and girls of color." Going forward, "we know that she will continue to be on the front lines speaking the truths of Black feminism.”

“The Girls Obama Forgot” can be found here: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/30/opinion/Kimberl-Williams-Crenshaw-My-Brothers-Keeper-Ignores-Young-Black-Women.html?_r=0

More information on AAPF’s advocacy for women and girls of color can be found on our website, aapf.org.

Kimberle Crenshaw & Eve Ensler to Receive Honorary Doctorate Degrees from John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Executive Director & Co-Founder Kimberle Crenshaw and Board Member Eve Ensler to Receive Honorary Doctorate Degrees from John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Students, alumni, faculty and guests will gather in the Theater at Madison Square Garden for the College’s 51st Commencement exercises on Wednesday, June 1, at 10:30 AM and 3:30 PM. Honorary doctorates will be presented to Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, noted legal scholar on the faculty of both UCLA and Columbia University law schools, and Eve Ensler, award-winning author of “The Vagina Monologues” and tireless advocate for gender-justice, who will also serve as speakers at the ceremonies.

Through law and literature, the 2016 honorees have long demonstrated their commitment to the cause of justice. A Distinguished Professor at the UCLA School of Law and a professor at Columbia Law School, Ms. Crenshaw co-founded the African American Policy Forum and the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies, for which she also serves as director. Internationally renowned for her work in civil rights law and critical race theory, Crenshaw's contribution to legal scholarship has changed the landscape of law school curriculum for the better. For the past 20 years her contributions to the field have shaped debates, research, and policies that challenge structural inequality, domination, and oppression.

Ms. Ensler first became known as the playwright who wrote and performed “The Vagina Monologues,” which has earned her an Obie Award for Best New Play, a Guggenheim Fellowship Award in Playwriting and, subsequently, a special Tony Award for her “substantial contribution of volunteered time and effort on behalf of humanitarian, social service, or charitable organizations.” As her work has been produced on stages around the country and worldwide, she has engaged in a parallel stream of activism through international V-Day campaigns and One Billion Rising events, focusing on the issue of justice for survivors of gender violence.

For more information about John Jay’s Commencement ceremonies, visithttp://www.jjay.cuny.edu/graduation.
 

AAPF in the News: April 2016 Edition

The Internet has Transformed the Way We Confront Sexual Harassment," Mashable, April 16, 2016

In light of the recent HBO film Confirmation, in this Mashable article, Professor Kimberlé Crenshaw reflects on how things would have been different in the digital age: "What we would have been saying was, 'Tweet, write, post so we can make this part of the conversation.'" 

News.Mic, April 6, 2016

Essence, April 18, 2016

Kimberlé Crenshaw Named Outstanding Scholar

Columbia Law School Professor Kimberlé Crenshaw has received the Outstanding Scholar Award from The Fellows of the American Bar Foundation. The annual prize recognizes exceptional scholarship in the law or in government. Crenshaw is the first woman of color to get the honor.

Crenshaw has been a pioneering scholar in the field of critical race theory, and her original scholarship on intersectionality has been deeply influential for recognizing how such interrelated identity categories as race, gender, and class result in overlapping forms of discrimination. She is the director of the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School and the co-founder and executive director of the African American Policy Forum. She also teaches at UCLA Law School and is the Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics Gender Institute 2015-2018.

Her work on race and gender influenced the equality clause in the South African Constitution, and in 2001 she authored the background paper on race and gender discrimination for the United Nations' World Conference on Racism, where she was instrumental in getting gender included in the conference’s final declaration.

An advocate for a gender-inclusive approach to racial justice interventions, Crenshaw has led the “Why We Can’t Wait” campaign. Last year she co-authored the critically acclaimed reports, “Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected” and “Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality against Black Women.”

She lectures and publishes widely. Her articles have appeared in such scholarly journals as The Harvard Law Review, The Stanford Law Review, and the National Black Law Journal, as well as in more mainstream media outlets like The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Nation, and Ms. Magazine. In addition to receiving numerous accolades in academic settings, Crenshaw was featured in Ebony’s Power 100, and she topped Ms. Magazine’s list of “Feminist Heroes of 2015.” Last year also brought recognition as one of Harvard Law School’s “Women Inspiring Change” and Diverse’s “Top 25 Women in Higher Education.”

“I'm the first to admit that I am not your typical scholar,” Crenshaw said in her acceptance speech at the ABF’s 60th annual awards banquet on Feb. 6 in San Diego. “I love ideas, but I have never loved them as abstract flights of indulgence, but as ways of experiencing, contesting, engaging a world that has only in the past half century or so taken seriously a commitment to righting civil wrongs.”