Kimberle Crenshaw & Eve Ensler to Receive Honorary Doctorate Degrees from John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Executive Director & Co-Founder Kimberle Crenshaw and Board Member Eve Ensler to Receive Honorary Doctorate Degrees from John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Students, alumni, faculty and guests will gather in the Theater at Madison Square Garden for the College’s 51st Commencement exercises on Wednesday, June 1, at 10:30 AM and 3:30 PM. Honorary doctorates will be presented to Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, noted legal scholar on the faculty of both UCLA and Columbia University law schools, and Eve Ensler, award-winning author of “The Vagina Monologues” and tireless advocate for gender-justice, who will also serve as speakers at the ceremonies.

Through law and literature, the 2016 honorees have long demonstrated their commitment to the cause of justice. A Distinguished Professor at the UCLA School of Law and a professor at Columbia Law School, Ms. Crenshaw co-founded the African American Policy Forum and the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies, for which she also serves as director. Internationally renowned for her work in civil rights law and critical race theory, Crenshaw's contribution to legal scholarship has changed the landscape of law school curriculum for the better. For the past 20 years her contributions to the field have shaped debates, research, and policies that challenge structural inequality, domination, and oppression.

Ms. Ensler first became known as the playwright who wrote and performed “The Vagina Monologues,” which has earned her an Obie Award for Best New Play, a Guggenheim Fellowship Award in Playwriting and, subsequently, a special Tony Award for her “substantial contribution of volunteered time and effort on behalf of humanitarian, social service, or charitable organizations.” As her work has been produced on stages around the country and worldwide, she has engaged in a parallel stream of activism through international V-Day campaigns and One Billion Rising events, focusing on the issue of justice for survivors of gender violence.

For more information about John Jay’s Commencement ceremonies, visithttp://www.jjay.cuny.edu/graduation.
 

AAPF in the News: February 2016 Edition

"Thandie Newton: We must see racism from the female perspective," USA Today, Feb. 26, 2016

"Fighting Erasure," The New York Times Magazine, Parul Sehgal, Feb. 2, 2016.

"Protestors Seek Action on Natasha McKenna," Courthouse News Service, Britain Eakin, Feb. 9, 2016.

"#ItsNotOver: Why the One Year Anniversary of Natasha McKenna's Death Matters," Huffington Post, Rachel Anspach, Feb. 7, 2016.

"6 Simple Ways White Women Can Be Feminist Allies for Black History Month (and Always)," Ms. Magazine Blog, Feb. 12, 2016.

  Huffington Post , Feb. 10, 2016.

Huffington Post, Feb. 10, 2016.

Media on the #Holtzclaw Sentencing

 "Activists Support Survivors of Sexual Assault in Holtzclaw Case,"  NBC News , Jan. 21, 2016.

"Activists Support Survivors of Sexual Assault in Holtzclaw Case," NBC News, Jan. 21, 2016.

 "Daniel Holtzclaw Sentenced to 263 Years in Prison,"  BuzzFeed News , Jan. 21, 2016.

"Daniel Holtzclaw Sentenced to 263 Years in Prison," BuzzFeed News, Jan. 21, 2016.

 "Police Officer Convicted of Serial Sexual Assault Gets 263 Years,"  MSNBC , Jan. 21, 2016.

"Police Officer Convicted of Serial Sexual Assault Gets 263 Years," MSNBC, Jan. 21, 2016.

 "Daniel Holtzclaw Gets 263 Years, Advocates Insist 'It's Not Over,'"  RH Reality Check , Jan. 21, 2016.

"Daniel Holtzclaw Gets 263 Years, Advocates Insist 'It's Not Over,'" RH Reality Check, Jan. 21, 2016.

 "'Journey to Justice' Isn't Over in Oklahoma City after Holtzclaw Trial." NewsOK, Jan. 24, 2016.

"'Journey to Justice' Isn't Over in Oklahoma City after Holtzclaw Trial." NewsOK, Jan. 24, 2016.

16 Most Memorable Black Twitter Moments of 2015 (Atlanta Blackstar)

#SayHerName

Black Twitter had been extremely vigilant in pointing to the police brutality and deaths of Mike Brown, Eric Garner, and other Black men who died while in police custody.  The #SayHerName hashtag was created by the African American Policy Forum as a means to raise awareness about police brutality against Black women.  Not only did the hashtag draw attention to those cases in the media that were often ignored, it also allowed others to share their experiences and encounters with police violence.

10 Hashtags That Got 2015's Life (Colorlines)

#SayHerName

No social media movement added more depth to #BlackLivesMatter than #SayHerName. The African American Policy Forum created the hashtag in support of its ongoing demand that Black women victims be included in the conversation about state violence against Black bodies. #SayHerName grew to encompass public outrage over Sandra Bland’s suspicious death in police custody and the multiple murders of trans women of color. The hashtag was in heavy rotation on May 21, a national day of action to highlight police brutality against Black women.

@sandylocks on why #SayHerName is critical to our racial justice movement. Read more herehttps://t.co/f91V5HEgFL pic.twitter.com/G6VC8LKyUn