KIMBERLE CRENSHAW AWARDED EXCEPTIONAL MERIT IN MEDIA AWARD FOR NEW YORK TIMES OP-ED, “THE GIRLS OBAMA FORGOT”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:
Rachel Anspach
Senior Writer, African American Policy Forum
rachel.anspach@aapf.org

KIMBERLE CRENSHAW AWARDED EXCEPTIONAL MERIT IN MEDIA AWARD FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES OP-ED, “THE GIRLS OBAMA FORGOT”

New York, New York -- May 16, 2016 -- The African American Policy Forum and the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies are pleased to announce that Executive Director Kimberle Crenshaw has been recognized by the National Women’s Political Caucus with the Exceptional Merit in Media Award (EMMA) for her New York Times op-ed, “The Girls Obama Forgot.” The EMMA is awarded annually to media that “inform and educate the public about critical issues that impact women’s lives.” Crenshaw contributed the column as part of #WhyWeCantWait, a research and activism campaign elevating the life experiences of women and girls of color and pushing for the incorporation of gender in racial justice initiatives like My Brother's Keeper.

The Award "truly reflects Kimberle Crenshaw’s boldness and commitment to racial justice,” commented author and professor Kiese Laymon. “After all, the White House's recent attention to Black women and girls grew out of a political strategy developed and brilliantly executed by a group of cultural workers and activists led by Crenshaw and the African American Policy Forum. We thank Kimberle for her leadership in making our nation’s leaders reckon with their lack of investment in Black women and girls."

Adds philanthropic strategist Alvin Starks: “Many of us were unaware or unwilling to speak about the injustices facing Black women and girls, but now we are better able to envision a social justice movement that includes and demands their presence."  

The op-ed, published July 29, 2014, was part of a broad-based intersectional political agenda galvanized by prominent Black feminists and advocates of all races and genders. Activists released open letters to President Obama, organized town hall hearings for women and girls of color to share their stories, organized a Congressional Briefing, and more, in an effort to realign racial justice initiatives like My Brother's Keeper to reflect values of inclusion, equal opportunity and shared fate.

Crenshaw's "leadership and courage have been instrumental in changing the landscape, discourse and direction for 'the girls Obama forgot,'" states playwright and activist Eve Ensler. "And I think we are all deepening our understanding and active practice of solidarity as a result."

Crenshaw acknowledges many others at the forefront of efforts to call on the White House to include women and girls in their campaign to redress the racial opportunity gap, including Laymon, Starks and Ensler, as well as Luke Harris, Mary Frances Berry, Terry O’Neill, Jody Myrum, Jennifer Buffett, Peter Buffett and Pamela Shifman.

Civil rights leader Barbara Arnwine, of the Transformative Justice Coalition, described by Crenshaw as "an inspirational ally," accepted the award on her behalf. Arnwine's remarks applauded Crenshaw as "a woman of great courage motivated by a deep love for women and girls of color." Going forward, "we know that she will continue to be on the front lines speaking the truths of Black feminism.”

“The Girls Obama Forgot” can be found here: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/30/opinion/Kimberl-Williams-Crenshaw-My-Brothers-Keeper-Ignores-Young-Black-Women.html?_r=0

More information on AAPF’s advocacy for women and girls of color can be found on our website, aapf.org.

Kimberle Crenshaw & Eve Ensler to Receive Honorary Doctorate Degrees from John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Executive Director & Co-Founder Kimberle Crenshaw and Board Member Eve Ensler to Receive Honorary Doctorate Degrees from John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Students, alumni, faculty and guests will gather in the Theater at Madison Square Garden for the College’s 51st Commencement exercises on Wednesday, June 1, at 10:30 AM and 3:30 PM. Honorary doctorates will be presented to Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, noted legal scholar on the faculty of both UCLA and Columbia University law schools, and Eve Ensler, award-winning author of “The Vagina Monologues” and tireless advocate for gender-justice, who will also serve as speakers at the ceremonies.

Through law and literature, the 2016 honorees have long demonstrated their commitment to the cause of justice. A Distinguished Professor at the UCLA School of Law and a professor at Columbia Law School, Ms. Crenshaw co-founded the African American Policy Forum and the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies, for which she also serves as director. Internationally renowned for her work in civil rights law and critical race theory, Crenshaw's contribution to legal scholarship has changed the landscape of law school curriculum for the better. For the past 20 years her contributions to the field have shaped debates, research, and policies that challenge structural inequality, domination, and oppression.

Ms. Ensler first became known as the playwright who wrote and performed “The Vagina Monologues,” which has earned her an Obie Award for Best New Play, a Guggenheim Fellowship Award in Playwriting and, subsequently, a special Tony Award for her “substantial contribution of volunteered time and effort on behalf of humanitarian, social service, or charitable organizations.” As her work has been produced on stages around the country and worldwide, she has engaged in a parallel stream of activism through international V-Day campaigns and One Billion Rising events, focusing on the issue of justice for survivors of gender violence.

For more information about John Jay’s Commencement ceremonies, visithttp://www.jjay.cuny.edu/graduation.
 

AAPF in the News: February 2016 Edition

"Thandie Newton: We must see racism from the female perspective," USA Today, Feb. 26, 2016

"Fighting Erasure," The New York Times Magazine, Parul Sehgal, Feb. 2, 2016.

"Protestors Seek Action on Natasha McKenna," Courthouse News Service, Britain Eakin, Feb. 9, 2016.

"#ItsNotOver: Why the One Year Anniversary of Natasha McKenna's Death Matters," Huffington Post, Rachel Anspach, Feb. 7, 2016.

"6 Simple Ways White Women Can Be Feminist Allies for Black History Month (and Always)," Ms. Magazine Blog, Feb. 12, 2016.

Huffington Post, Feb. 10, 2016.

Huffington Post, Feb. 10, 2016.

Media on the #Holtzclaw Sentencing

"Activists Support Survivors of Sexual Assault in Holtzclaw Case," NBC News, Jan. 21, 2016.

"Activists Support Survivors of Sexual Assault in Holtzclaw Case," NBC News, Jan. 21, 2016.

"Daniel Holtzclaw Sentenced to 263 Years in Prison," BuzzFeed News, Jan. 21, 2016.

"Daniel Holtzclaw Sentenced to 263 Years in Prison," BuzzFeed News, Jan. 21, 2016.

"Police Officer Convicted of Serial Sexual Assault Gets 263 Years," MSNBC, Jan. 21, 2016.

"Police Officer Convicted of Serial Sexual Assault Gets 263 Years," MSNBC, Jan. 21, 2016.

"Daniel Holtzclaw Gets 263 Years, Advocates Insist 'It's Not Over,'" RH Reality Check, Jan. 21, 2016.

"Daniel Holtzclaw Gets 263 Years, Advocates Insist 'It's Not Over,'" RH Reality Check, Jan. 21, 2016.

"'Journey to Justice' Isn't Over in Oklahoma City after Holtzclaw Trial." NewsOK, Jan. 24, 2016.

"'Journey to Justice' Isn't Over in Oklahoma City after Holtzclaw Trial." NewsOK, Jan. 24, 2016.

16 Most Memorable Black Twitter Moments of 2015 (Atlanta Blackstar)

#SayHerName

Black Twitter had been extremely vigilant in pointing to the police brutality and deaths of Mike Brown, Eric Garner, and other Black men who died while in police custody.  The #SayHerName hashtag was created by the African American Policy Forum as a means to raise awareness about police brutality against Black women.  Not only did the hashtag draw attention to those cases in the media that were often ignored, it also allowed others to share their experiences and encounters with police violence.