What's Right and Wrong about My Brother's Keeper: Black Men Engage

June 13th- National Briefing

What’s Right and Wrong about "My Brother’s Keeper": Black Men Engage

MBK3
MBK3

On May 30th a Letter of 200 Concerned Black Men Calling for the Inclusion of Women and Girls to the President’s “My Brother’s Keeper” Initiative was sent to President Barack Obama. The open letter questions how attempts to address the challenges facing males of color, without integrating a comparable focus on the complex lives of girls and women who live and struggle together in the same families, homes, schools, and neighborhoods, advances the interests of the community as a whole.  The men who came together to lift up this issue are organizers, professors, recently incarcerated, filmmakers, taxi drivers, college students, high school teachers, ministers, former pro­-athletes, fathers of sons, and fathers of daughters. These men, identifying as straight, queer and transgender, all share a commitment to the expansion of "My Brothers Keeper" ­­(MBK) and all other national youth interventions to include an explicit focus on the structural conditions that negatively impact all youth of color.

Friday June 13th at 2:30 PM EST/ 11:30 AM PST

RSVP for the Webinar Here

Please join a roundtable of leading critical race scholars, lawyers, journalists, and thought leaders for a national webinar on President Obama’s ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ Initiative and  the recently released open letter entitled "Letter of 200 Concerned Black Men Call for the Inclusion of Women and Girls in ‘My Brother’s Keeper.’"

Moderated by FAIR’s Janine Jackson, the conversation will provide information about the content of ‘My Brother’s Keeper’, and will present a case for the inclusion of girls and women in this exclusively male initiative.

Our conversation will cover the following issues:

  • How the premise that informs the exclusion of Black females from MBK–that Black males are worse off than Black females–is faulty.
  • Why the lives of and issues that impact Black girls and women tend to be invisible.
  • Why Black men need to be self-reflective about our place in a system that privileges men.
  • Why Black Male interventions are not necessarily progressive even for Black men.
  • What we all must to do to reclaim a vision of racial justice that centers the concerns of the entire community, women as well as men, girls as well as women. 

Confirmed Participants Include:

Janine Jackson
Janine Jackson
kieselaymon
kieselaymon
darnellmoore
darnellmoore
lukeharris
lukeharris
marlonpeterson
marlonpeterson
paulbutler
paulbutler
  • Janine Jackson (Moderator), Program Director at Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR)
  • Kiese Laymon, Author of "Long Division" and "How To Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America"

--> "Am I My Sister's Keeper?" --> "Hey Mama"

  • Darnell Moore, Managing Editor, The Feminist, Writer, and Co-Founder of the youth initiative You Belong.

--> "Mother to Son: A Conversation on Black Womanhood and Survival" --> "Darnell L. Moore on Love, Liberation and Critiquing 'My Brother's Keeper'"

  • Luke Harris, Co-Founder of African American Policy Forum

--> "Why We Need to be Our Brother's and Sister's Keeper"

  • Marlon Peterson, Director of Community Relations at the Fortune Society

--> "Dear 02a3172: Letters to and From a Caged Bird" --> "A Systems Perspective to 'My Brother's Keeper'" --> "Black Girls Also Victims of Gun Violence"

  • Paul Butler, Former federal prosecutor with the United States Department of Justice and the author of “Let’s Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice"

--> "Black Male Exceptionalism? The Problems and Potential of Black Male-Focused Interventions"

This event is hosted by the African American Policy Forum.