(PART 8) UNDER THE BLACKLIGHT:

WHAT’S THE MATTER WITH GEORGIA?
VIRUS, VOTING & VIGILANTISM IN THE PEACH STATE

Panelists:

Crystal Feimster is a tenured Associate Professor of African American Studies, History and American Studies at Yale University. Feimster’s academic focus is racial and sexual violence; currently, she is completing a project on rape during the American Civil War. Her book, Southern Horrors: Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching, focuses on two women journalists, Ida B. Wells, who campaigned against lynching, and Rebecca Latimer Felton, who urged white men to prove their manhood by lynching black men accused of raping white women.

Talitha LeFlouria is the Lisa Smith Discovery Associate Professor in African and African-American Studies at the University of Virginia. She is a scholar of African American history, specializing in mass incarceration; modern slavery; race and medicine; and black women in America. She is the author of Chained in Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South. This book received several national awards including: the Darlene Clark Hine Award from the Organization of American Historians, the Philip Taft Labor History Award from the Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations & Labor and Working-Class History Association, the Malcolm Bell, Jr. and Muriel Barrow Bell Award from the Georgia Historical Society, the Best First Book Prize from the Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities, the Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Prize from the Association of Black Women Historians, and the Ida B. Wells Tribute Award from the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. Her work has been featured in the Sundance nominated documentary, Slavery by Another Name as well as C-SPAN and Left of Black. Her written work and expertise has been profiled in Ms. Magazine, The Nation, Huffington Post, For Harriet, The New Tri-State Defender, ColorBlind Magazine, and several syndicated radio programs.

 

Emery Wright is an Atlanta native who was raised to be part of Black radical traditions of the U.S. South. Emery carries 2 decades of experience in community organizing, movement building, and political education working primarily across the U.S. South. Prior to working at Project South, Emery co-founded and directed a Black youth organization called The Nia Project which organized in Boston, Coastal South Carolina, and Atlanta. He co-founded and co-facilitated a weekly Black Studies course at South Bay Prison, and he has developed learning and leadership exchanges between grassroots organizers in the U.S., the greater Caribbean, and East Africa. Emery joined the Project South staff team in 2004 and was part of a successful leadership transition to Co-Director in 2007. Emery serves on the board of WRFG, the 35-year old community radio station in Atlanta, the Georgia Citizens’ Coalition on Hunger, and Project Vote.

Anoa J. Changa is a staff reporter leading Prism's coverage of electoral justice and voting rights. An organizer by nature and a lawyer by trade, Anoa has a deep history of working within the realms of advocacy and justice. Her passion lies in building collaborative political spaces that fundamentally change the way communities and grassroots organizations engage with the social and political systems around us. Expanding on her experience as an attorney, Anoa has been a grassroots digital organizer and strategic advisor to several organizations. Prior to Prism, Changa worked for the New Georgia Project, a nonpartison effort to register and civically engage Georgian voters, where she was the director of digital strategy and storytelling. Prior to that, she held the position of cities electoral manager for Democracy for America. Anoa is a movement journalist, deeply influenced by grassroots-led electoral organizing efforts. She is the host of the podcast “The Way with Anoa” tackling politics and current events through a Black progressive feminist perspective. Anoa has bylines in The Independent, The Nation, Dame Magazine, Huffington Post, and Rewire.News. She is a speaker, trainer, and presenter in progressive spaces.

LaTosha Brown is an award-winning organizer, philanthropic consultant, political strategist and jazz singer with over twenty years of experience working in the non-profit and philanthropy sectors on a wide variety of issues related to political empowerment, social justice, economic development, leadership development, wealth creation and civil rights. She is the co-founder of Black Voters Matter Fund, a power building southern based civic engagement organization that played an instrumental role in the 2017 Alabama U.S. Senate race. Ms. Brown is principal owner of TruthSpeaks Consulting, Inc., a philanthropy advisory consulting firm in Atlanta, GA. For more than 25 years, she has served as a consultant and advisor for individual donors, government, public foundations and private donors.