(PART 9) UNDER THE BLACKLIGHT:

NARRATING THE NIGHTMARE

& (RE)IMAGINING THE POSSIBLE

Panelists:

Arundhati Roy studied architecture in New Delhi, where she now lives. She has worked as a film designer and screenplay writer in India. Roy is the author of the novel The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Man Booker Prize. The novel has been translated into dozens of languages worldwide. She has written several non-fiction books, including The Cost of Living, Power Politics, War Talk, An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire and Public Power in the Age of Empire, Field Notes on Democracy, Walking with the Comrades, Capitalism: A Ghost Story, The End of Imagination, and Things That Can and Cannot Be Said (co-authored with John Cusack). Roy was featured in the BBC television documentary Dam/age, which is about the struggle against big dams in India. A collection of interviews with Arundhati Roy by David Barsamian was published as The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile. A collection of her essays from the past twenty years, My Seditious Heart, was recently published by Haymarket Books. Roy is the recipient of the 2002 Lannan Foundation Cultural Freedom Prize, the 2011 Norman Mailer Prize for Distinguished Writing, and the 2015 Ambedkar Sudar award.

Kiese Laymon is the Ottilie Schillig Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Mississippi. Laymon is the author of the novel, Long Division and a collection of essays, How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America, and Heavy: An American Memoir. Heavy, winner of the Andrew Carnegie Medal, the LA Times Isherwood Prize for Autobiographical Prose and Audible’s Audiobook of the Year, was named one of the Best Books of 2018 by the The Undefeated, New York Times, Publishers Weekly, NPR, Broadly, Library Journal , The Washington Post , Southern Living , Entertainment Weekly, San Francisco Chronicle, and The New York Times Critics. Laymon has written essays, stories and reviews for numerous publications including Esquire, McSweeneys, New York Times, Virginia Quarterly Review, ESPN the Magazine, Granta, Colorlines, NPR, LitHub, The Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, PEN Journal, Fader, Oxford American, Vanity Fair, The Best American Series, Ebony, Travel and Leisure, Paris Review, Guernica, and more. 

Viet Thanh Nguyen is a University Professor, Aerol Arnold Chair of English, and Professor of English, American Studies and Ethnicity, and Comparative Literature at the University of Southern California. He is the author of Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America, multiple award winning The Sympathizer, and Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War which was a finalist for the National Book Award in nonfiction and the National Book Critics Circle Award in General Nonfiction. His current books are The Refugees, and The Displaced: Refugee Writers on Refugee Lives, which he edited. He is an opinion writer for the New York Times, and has written for Time, The Guardian, The Atlantic, and other venues. His articles have appeared in numerous journals and books, including PMLA, American Literary History, Western American Literature, positions: east asia cultures critique, The New Centennial Review, Postmodern Culture, the Japanese Journal of American Studies, and Asian American Studies After Critical Mass.