AAPF Staff

Kimberlé Crenshaw
Co-Founder & Executive Director

Kimberlé Crenshaw is the Co-Founder and Executive Director of the African American Policy Forum, and the founder and Executive Director of the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School. She is the Promise Institute Professor at UCLA Law School and the Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor at Columbia Law School.

 

She is popularly known for her development of “intersectionality,” “Critical Race Theory,” and the #SayHerName Campaign, and is the host of the podcast Intersectionality Matters!. She also is a columnist for The New Republic, and the moderator of the widely impactful webinar series Under The Blacklight: The Intersectional Vulnerabilities that the Twin Pandemics Lay Bare. She is one of the most cited scholars in legal history and has been recognized as Ms. magazine’s “No. 1 Most Inspiring Feminist;” one of Prospect Magazine's h ten most important thinkers in the world; and even listed in Ebony’s “Power 100” issue.

Dr. Luke Charles Harris
Co-Founder & Assistant Director

Dr. Luke Charles Harris Luke Charles Harris is a former Chair of the Department of Political Science at Vassar College, 2002-2005, and the Co-founder and Program Director of the African American Policy Forum. He teaches American Politics, Black Feminist Legal Theory, Constitutional Interpretation and Critical Race Theory. An expert in the field of Critical Race Theory, Harris has authored a series of influential articles on questions of racial and gender equality in the U.S.

Recently, he completed Seeing Race Again: Countering Colorblindness Across the Disciplines, a co-authored edited volume released for publication in March  2019 by the University of California Press (Editors: Kimberle Crenshaw, Luke Charles Harris, Daniel Martinez HoSang, and George Lipsitz). Currently Luke is working on two book projects: Notes from A Child of Apartheid: The Meaning of Equality in Post-Apartheid America, and The Race Track: Understanding and Challenging Structural Racism, co-authored with Kimberle Crenshaw and George Lipsitz.

Shermena Nelson
Chief of Staff & Director of Programs and Community Engagement

Shermena Nelson serves as AAPF's Chief of Staff/Director of Programs and Community Engagement. Shermena is an Afro-Cuban macro social worker and attorney who focuses on interventions in larger systems, such as communities and organizations, in order to effect change that will enhance the lives of individuals. A native New Yorker, Shermena holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science (minor in African American Studies) from Howard University, a Juris Doctor from the University of the District of Columbia, and a Masters of Social Work from New York University. Shermena’s areas of practice include Program Development and Management, Legal Advocacy, Trauma, Loss and Bereavement.  

Kevin Minofu
Senior Research Fellow

Kevin Minofu serves as the AAPF Senior Research Fellow.  A former law clerk to Justice Sisi Khampepe of the Constitutional Court of South Africa, he graduated from Columbia Law School with his LLM as a James Kent Scholar in 2018 where he had research interests in civil rights, legal philosophy and comparative constitutional law. He holds both an undergraduate degree in economics and a law degree from the University of Cape Town in South Africa. He also spent several years practicing as an associate at a large commercial law firm in Johannesburg and is an admitted attorney of the South African bar.

Julia Sharpe-Levine
Arts & Education Program Director

Julia Sharpe-Levine is a writer, activist and theatre-maker living in Brooklyn. After serving as the Associate Director for 2 years, she now serves as AAPF's Arts and Education Program Director. She has led workshops on theatre and social engagement, and has written articles on politics and intersectionality for publications such as the Huffington Post and Rewire Magazine. She has a Master's degree in Applied Theatre from CUNY's School of Professional Studies and a Bachelor's degree in drama and Chinese from Vassar College, where she graduated with honors. She is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa National Honor Society. 

Michael Kramer
Program Coordinator

Michael Kramer is the Intersectionality Fellow at UCLA School of Law, where he earned his Juris Doctorate with a specialization in Critical Race Studies, and has worked with Kimberlé Crenshaw. Previously, Michael worked with the Washington State Attorney General’s Civil Rights Unit where he worked on various issues of civil rights, immigration, and antidiscrimination on both a state and national level. In addition, Michael has worked with two tribal nation supreme courts (Hualapai in Arizona and Ho-Chunk in Wisconsin) where he assisted in legal research, drafting legal opinions, and developing their law. As a law student, Michael was a semi-finalist in the Jean-Pictet International Humanitarian Law Competition, honored with the prestigious Order of the Barrister award as a top oral advocate, and manager of the National Black Law Journal. Michael’s scholarship has involved voting rights, tribal jurisprudence, and discrimination in disability law.

Emmett O'Malley
Executive Assistant to Kimberlé Crenshaw and Program Coordinator

Emmett O’Malley serves as the Executive Assistant to Kimberlé Crenshaw and as AAPF’s Project Coordinator. He joined the team in 2019 after graduating with honors from Vassar College where he worked closely with Dr. Luke Charles Harris while concentrating in Political Science and Philosophy. His Senior Thesis, titled “Modern Athlete Activism, and the Structures of American Society,” examined the intersection of sports and politics, particularly as it pertains to the relationship between capitalism and anti-racism. In 2017 and 2018, Emmett worked as a Residential Teaching Fellow for the Exploring Transfer Program, and as a Research Assistant for AAPF.

Alanna Kane
Research & Writing Fellow

Alanna Kane is an intersectional activist, queer Trinidadian, and aspiring legal scholar aiming to disempower the entanglements of race, racism, and the law. She is a rising second year student at UCLA School of Law where she specializes in Critical Races Studies. Prior to law school, she worked as a paralegal in the Competition section of White & Case LLP. She graduated Dartmouth College in 2017 cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in Government and double minor in International Studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Her interested research areas include suspect classification doctrine, tiers of scrutiny, and equal protection. As a former intern at AAPF in 2016, she is humbled, energized, and excited to return to the team as a research assistant!

Allison Monterrosa
Research Assistant

Allison Monterrosa is a Ph.D. candidate in the Sociology Department at the University of California Riverside, and a fellow with the American Association of University Women. Her areas of specialization are critical criminology, socio-legal studies, medical sociology, and critical race and gender theories. Research topics include gender-based violence, racialized state violence, the health implications of racism and social policy. Allison has worked as a researcher for a mixed-method, multi-site study, through the UCR School of Medicine’s Center for Healthy Communities to explore the influence of racial socialization and cultural pride on children’s early school readiness, health and well-being. Her current research examines the intersections of the carceral state, intimate partner violence and health among Black women with criminal-legal system involvement.

Judith Williams
Research Assistant

Judith Williams is a McKnight Doctoral Fellow and a Ph.D. Candidate in the field of Sociocultural Anthropology from the interdisciplinary department of Global and Sociocultural studies at Florida International University. A former chef and caterer, her research focuses on Black foodways, racial capitalism, whiteness, colorism, and intersectionality. Her dissertation research uses an intersectional framework to examine effects of whiteness and the negotiation of racial inequalities among workers in Miami’s Latinx dominated restaurant industry. After completing her Ph.D., Judith plans to work in policy as a public intellectual on issues related to racial equity.

Nicole Young
Writing Assistant

Nicole Young is an educator, writer, coach, and policy wonk who is working to build a world with liberation and equity at the center. Nicole previously served as executive director at Bard Early College in New Orleans after working at the United States Department of Education and the White House. Nicole graduated from the University of South Carolina with a bachelor’s degree in international studies, and from the University of Pennsylvania with an M.S.Ed. in education policy.

Vineeta Singh
Writing Assistant

Vineeta Singh is completing a postdoctoral fellowship with "The Lemon Project: A Journey of Reconciliation," the College of William & Mary's public history initiative reckoning with its 300-year history of anti-blackness. Her work with the Lemon Project focuses on building partnerships with community orgs working on educational and other reparative justice efforts to counter the university's historically extractive relationships with Black communities in the Tidewater region. Her research, teaching, and service work are all informed by her research on modern U.S. higher education as a racial frontier and her Ph.D. training in Ethnic Studies at the University of California, San Diego. 

Awoye Timpo
Creative Arts Administrator

Awoye Timpo is a New York-based performing arts director and producer. Her work with AAPF includes development of the play Say Her Name: The Lives That Should Have Been. Awoye’s New York credits include work at New York Theatre Workshop, The Vineyard Theatre, The Playwrights Realm, Atlantic Theater Company, the National Black Theater and the Public Theater. Regionally she has directed at Studio Theatre (DC), Actors Theatre of Louisville, Long Wharf Theatre (New Haven) and Berkeley Rep. Her work has also been seen in Edinburgh and Johannesburg. Awoye works as a Creative Director for music events and is a Producer of CLASSIX, a series exploring classic plays by Black playwrights.

Abby Dobson
Artist-in-Residence

Abby Dobson is AAPF's Artist-In-Residence. A Sonic Conceptualist Artist, Dobson’s sound is the alchemy of R&B/Soul, jazz, classic pop, gospel, and folk, forging a gem that erases musical boundaries. Abby has performed at venues such as S.O.B's, Kennedy Center Millennium Stage, Apollo Theater, Blue Note Jazz Club, and The Tonight Show (Jay Leno). Her debut CD, "Sleeping Beauty: You Are the One You Have Been Waiting On” was released in 2010 to glowing reviews. Abby received a Juris Doctorate degree from Georgetown University Law Center and a Bachelor’s degree from Williams College in Political Science and History. An independent scholar, Abby’s research interests focus on the intersection of race and gender in the imagination, creation, consumption, and distribution of music. Passionate about using music as a tool for empathy cultivation, Abby creates music to privilege black female voices and highlight the human condition. She is committed to shining her artistic light - volunteering with the African American Policy Forum and the National Organization for Women, NYC Chapter. www.abbydobsonsings.com

info@aapf.org   |  (212) 854-3049  |  435 West 116th Street New York, NY 10027

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