Days of Visibility & Accountability: Oklahoma City


While the Holtzclaw trial may inspire the community to become more actively engaged, we recognize the need to discuss the broader context of criminal justice reform that includes: ending police brutality, exposing internal police data involving sexual misconduct, ensuring equitable representation in judicial proceedings, and reviewing police policy and internal procedures in relation to abuse of power.

When the lives of marginalized Black women such as Jannie Ligons are centered, a clearer picture of structural oppression emerges. No analysis of state violence against Black bodies can be complete without including all Black bodies within its frame. Until we say the names and tell the stories of the entire Black community, we cannot truly claim to fight for all Black lives. Pledge your commitment to join us during this critical moment in the history of our efforts for a society that values all lives equally. 

Join the vital conversation on social media using #SayHerName#BlackWomenMatter, and #ItsNotOver.

January 19: Prepare to take Action: Join us for a webinar on the Holtzclaw case and sexual abuse of Black women by law enforcement. Hear from the Organizers of OKC Artists for Justice and other voices from across the country. Share your plans for Visibility and Accountability.

January 20th: Make Sexual Assault by Law Enforcement Visible: Stand with the Women in OKC and around the country to bring Sexual Abuse by Police Out of the Shadows!

January 21st: Demand Accountability from Officers, Institutions and Allies: Not only must police departments and elected officials be held accountable, but police sexual abuse must be centered in feminist anti-violence advocacy and anti-racist police reform.
For our previous conversations, see "It's Not Over Yet," a webinar featuring Oklahoma City organizers and other leaders who will explain why this case must be a call to action.